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William Frinchaboy

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About William Frinchaboy

  • Rank
    Bill Frinchaboy
  • Birthday 08/26/1949

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Valley Center, California.
  • Interests
    4 kids and 4 little grandkids, My 2 sons love golf but don't have time. We love fishing during the summer. Teach at a driving range. I am building a lit teaching area at home so I can teach at night during the summer. I am a short game specialist, cutting strokes very quickly from my students' scores. i have always taught sports. I get really stoked during a teaching session. I think that is my motivation for teaching.
  1. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    Hi Gary, How is Petaluma? I went to college at Chico State and lived in Paradise, at about 3000 ft. elevation. Played golf in the Sierras near lake Oreville at a course called tall pines. Right? We called that course "foul Pines" My wife and I considered Petaluma after graduation but moved back down to San Diegp area due to parents being ill. Sports were so important when we were kids. My uncle played QB for USC after ww2 and we used to go to his house for thanksgiving and I though for years that it was a football celebration. The Rams, the Dodgers, and USC. that was life. I am sure that is the way it still is for plenty of kids. What did you think of tiger's rounds? I think he came back too soon. Tim Clark's draw and great putting didn't help Tiger too often. later, william
  2. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    Tom, thanks for the advice. The rounds are on wed and thursday. so I will walk or play the course on monday and tuesday, or just tuesday. I will probably only chip and pitch into the greens and putt a lot. My first P.a.t. I played too many holes leadiing up to it. Classic mistake. I know this is a late repy but thanks again. WF. William, Great advice so far, if I could add a few things I would say if you could play a practice round before your qualifier try and determine your “personal par” for the course. In another words if par is 71, but you have 2 par 4’s that play 450 yards or more you may want to realistically play them like par 5’s. If you have a tough 235 yard par 3 play it like a par 4. Using my example your par would go from 71 to 74, but standing on the tee on those tough holes it’s a lot less intimidating playing that par 3 like a par 4, you’ll make many more “birdies” (in this case a 3) that way. Also, if you can’t play a practice round at least try and take some time and walk the course and take notes. I would suggest walking it in reverse, from the 18th green back to the 18th tee, to the 17th green back to the 17th tee and so forth. While doing this choose the optimal landing area for your tee shots on par fours, and safe good lay up yardages on par 5’s. Then measure back to the tee from that prime wide landing area or area short of a fairway bunker and you may be surprised that you wont need the distance on your tee shot that you may think when just looking at the score card. On par 3’s pick the fat part of the greens and don’t short side yourself. Your much better off with a 25 foot putt from the center of the green then trying to chip from 5 feet off the green on the short side trying to get it close. When walking the course find the side of the hole to favor your tee shot misses, left side of the fairway you may have to deal with overhanging trees, but the right rough leaves a clear shot to the green. Know what’s behind each green, rough, bunker, or maybe a sharp drop off. This will help you decide how aggressive you may want to be shooting at pins cut on the back of the green. I know it sounds cliché, but really try and forget your score, focus on the smallest possible targets, trust your swing and play one shot at a time. I’ve seen far to many players in tournaments bogy the first 3 or 4 holes, then deciding they had no shot relaxed and played well for the next 11 holes. Only then to realize that they are only 3 or 4 over with 3 holes to play and start trying to “concentrate”, then go on to finish with 3 straight doubles and blow their chance. Its easier said then done but try and relax and enjoy the process. Your first shot of the first round has no more meaning the last shot on the 36th hole, they all count the same. At all cost avoid the big number, when you’re in trouble your first concern is getting out of trouble. Don’t try and play a miracle shot, a bogy won’t hurt you, but doubles and triples will. Good luck!
  3. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    Hi Mark, I was worried that my entry looked like I was claiming to have pitched in the majors. I grew up in Los Angeles so I refer to it a lot, as a time period or something like that. I wouldn't recommend L.A. for anything except some nice golf courses all over that county. I am enjoying this forum a lot, having read all of the topics. I have read most of your article as well. Great job on that. William
  4. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    Hi Scott I pitched for about 8 years but quit when I discovered surfing. Like a zombie, I dropped every thing to be at the beach. I pitched until I was 18. I threw a no hitter and several 2 and 3 hitters but I had an advantage. My uncle would teach me during the off season. I threw a two finger knuckle ball and a "fork ball" that is now called the "splitter". Don't get me started. I tried out for a college team at 25 and made the team only to find out I didn't have enough units during the previous fall. Later I taught baseball for about 6 years while my kids were growing up. Teaching baseball, soccer, and martial arts is what inspired me to be a golf teacher. I enjoy seeing their satisfaction and self esteem go up with success. anyway, taht's the long answer. I mentioned L.A. cause baseball was so big there when I was growing up. My dad's company had box seats behind first base when Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale were starters. What about you?
  5. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    hey Warren, this sounds like a great idea but then I start going for it. It puts you up against par each time. I am going to try it this coming weekend if it doesn't rain like hell. I do analize my score all the way. I can see that your method could help a player to stay in the moment. I have played well under pressure as a kid but now I need this level 111 for my success as a teacher. I got too worked up during the first 18. both times. I am hitting the ball a lot longer right now. During Christmas I was getting 265 out of my 10.5 degree 983k. Must have been a juiced up ball. Last week a 185 five iron from a bunker. my confidence is better right now, but not scoring that well. Where do you teach? Sounds like you have a lot of experience with players. --William
  6. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

    hey Tom, Spoken like a sage. Seriously, no one could have said it better. I used to be a starting pitcher in Los Angeles and I would get so pumped up before a game that I would get sick to my stomach. once the game started I was fine. All of the advice that I have read so far is right on. Bob Jones quoted a famous British golfer, saying that you have to play with "courageous timidity" meaning you constantly have to fight or control the desire to qet aggressive on a shot or in a round. Ray floyd has a great book on scoring when you are not on your game. He explains how he played with Sam Snead and learned course management from the older and wiser Slammer. I like the idea of raising par on the tougher holes, using irons off the tee, pling safe the entire round, not keeping score, not socializing, being prepared to make the shot. Thanks again for the advice. William, Great advice so far, if I could add a few things I would say if you could play a practice round before your qualifier try and determine your “personal par” for the course. In another words if par is 71, but you have 2 par 4’s that play 450 yards or more you may want to realistically play them like par 5’s. If you have a tough 235 yard par 3 play it like a par 4. Using my example your par would go from 71 to 74, but standing on the tee on those tough holes it’s a lot less intimidating playing that par 3 like a par 4, you’ll make many more “birdies” (in this case a 3) that way. Also, if you can’t play a practice round at least try and take some time and walk the course and take notes. I would suggest walking it in reverse, from the 18th green back to the 18th tee, to the 17th green back to the 17th tee and so forth. While doing this choose the optimal landing area for your tee shots on par fours, and safe good lay up yardages on par 5’s. Then measure back to the tee from that prime wide landing area or area short of a fairway bunker and you may be surprised that you wont need the distance on your tee shot that you may think when just looking at the score card. On par 3’s pick the fat part of the greens and don’t short side yourself. Your much better off with a 25 foot putt from the center of the green then trying to chip from 5 feet off the green on the short side trying to get it close. When walking the course find the side of the hole to favor your tee shot misses, left side of the fairway you may have to deal with overhanging trees, but the right rough leaves a clear shot to the green. Know what’s behind each green, rough, bunker, or maybe a sharp drop off. This will help you decide how aggressive you may want to be shooting at pins cut on the back of the green. I know it sounds cliché, but really try and forget your score, focus on the smallest possible targets, trust your swing and play one shot at a time. I’ve seen far to many players in tournaments bogy the first 3 or 4 holes, then deciding they had no shot relaxed and played well for the next 11 holes. Only then to realize that they are only 3 or 4 over with 3 holes to play and start trying to “concentrate”, then go on to finish with 3 straight doubles and blow their chance. Its easier said then done but try and relax and enjoy the process. Your first shot of the first round has no more meaning the last shot on the 36th hole, they all count the same. At all cost avoid the big number, when you’re in trouble your first concern is getting out of trouble. Don’t try and play a miracle shot, a bogy won’t hurt you, but doubles and triples will. Good luck!
  7. William Frinchaboy

    P.A.T. at the Las Vegas Muni, April 1st.

  8. I am going for my third try to reach the level three. Does anybody have any details about this course, like the wind, greens, lies, etc. ? thanks, William
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